Monday, 2 November 2020

7 Months (unplanned) hiatus.

  Posted at  November 02, 2020 2 comments

Hello fellow friends and investors!

Sorry, I have not been updating the blog as much as I would have liked. Hope everyone is still coping well in this Covid-19 pandemic season. I miss everyone and indeed miss having the luxury of time to sit down, study stocks, read books and craft blog posts.

I still do post and share articles I find useful on facebook! Click to follow the following to receive updates:

What changed in the last 7 months? (work wise)


My last blog post happened during the "crash" back in March. That coincided with a working from home implementation by my company.

I had thought that working from home would mean that I would have more time at home to "do my own things". As it turns out, I misjudged the situation. 


1. Resilient Business and Projects = Extended working hours


Even though with Covid-19, at work I was expected to continue to run projects (but with reduced manpower) to fulfill expectations. The overall effect was that the amount of follow-up and liaising often carried past the usual 8-5pm working hours as I needed to keep up the communications with overseas colleagues often till midnight.

This was further compounded when the lockdown lifted in Mid June 2020 when projects that were halted during the lockdown were suddenly requested by customers (with shorter timeframes/deadlines). The silver lining above all these busyness was that the industry I am in is still proving to be resilient in the face of recession so far. This is despite my parent company suffering and having retrenchment exercise. It has so far not spilled over to my company (yet).


2. Isolation/ Managerial changes has been tough for me 


When I was getting into the rhythm of the new normal, something else hit like a truck. The manager who is currently in charge of me and who was the mentor/manager who hired me suddenly announced his retirement.

Now, I am unsure what were the reasons behind his retirement. It could be that the company also took the chance to reduce cost, but the official reason was to go back to his family and enjoy an early retirement.

What this meant for me is that I felt much of the work I've done is now going to go unrecognized for the new incoming manager who is stationed halfway around the globe. I fear for my future role at work now that my "backing" is gone and that has brought about alot of anxiety at work.

Because often at work - we really work for our immediate managers.


So, here I am again: Back to the drawing board


I am finally now able to take a step back to clear leave, take a breather and re-align. After much reflection, I guess I have the following choices:

  • Default position: Stay on and win the trust of the new manager. Continue to deliver
  • Start looking out for new opportunities: There have still been some decent enquires received on LinkedIn. Unfortunately, I have not stayed in a single position for more than 2 years in my last 3 jobs (voluntarily and involuntarily). 

It would be a shame to leave this current organisation prematurely as there are still things to be learnt. Thus, default position would be to bite down the teeth and grind out some results.


What changed in the last 7 months? (Investing wise)


From my last post, I have only added YZJ Shipbldg (SGX:BS6) at $0.985. This was because in spite of the pandemic, YZJ has still secured business.

Quoting this article in 30 April 2020: "As at 31 March 2020, Yangzijiang sat on an orderbook of $2.9bn for 69 vessels, excluding the 157,000-dwt tanker. The orders are expected to keep the yards at a healthy utilisation rate up to late-2021 and provide a stable revenue stream for at least the next 1.5 years."

https://www.seatrade-maritime.com/shipbuilding/yangzijiang-bags-seven-newbuilding-orders-worth-360m-q1

I certainly have hopes that this industry would still continue to stay resilient. Also, announced in August 2020, YZJ has secured new orders with Hong Kong based SITC for six 1, 800 TEU gearless container carriers

As the time of writing today on 2nd November 2020, its recovery in June has quickly given way to uncertainties in the wider global market on the backdrop of US elections, and the fears of second waves of Covid-19 in US and Europe.

YZJ chart from point of entry back in May 2020 (Blue arrow)

1. Portfolio Update 2nd November 2020.


I am now relying on Stocks Cafe to quickly track my portfolio. It saves me time to compute individual stock returns and I am able to focus on tracking my expenses and savings rate. I still do run my own portfolio tracker and tabulate it once a month.

However, Stocks Cafe does give quick analysis tools that I find helpful to track the progress of my portfolio. 

The Covid-19 has seen a sharp drop, with share recovery but now fallen back into negative zone.

2. Stocks watch (US elections/ Covid-19 wave 2) - SReits


I am now currently watching the market for opportunities as many of the SGX counters are down and it could present a new opportunity to accumulate shares again (like what happened in March 2020). The Singapore market has barely recovered and it has since become the worst performing stock market in Asia.

Overall market is still in down trend but it presents opportunities to buy in counters that are trading at discount from their recent highs. 


Of course, the talk of town all over the papers is about Robinson's closure. According to a Straits Times article on 31st October 2020, they have been making losses for at least the past 6 years. The following reasons were cited:

  • Increase of heartland malls (more competition/less traffic)
  • Onslaught of online businesses.
  • Covid-19 impact (but it is recognised that they were already struggling before Covid)

Source: https://www.straitstimes.com/business/companies-markets/singapore-reits-exposure-to-robinsons-owner-in-spotlight-as-fashion

There have been many netizens pointing fingers at the "Landlords", and that REITs are evil for being money suckers. However, I think these are knee jerk reactions. In the past, we've seen many departmental stores close down as well. Mr Market run in cycles and unfortunately, it seems we are at the end of a business and economic cycle brought about by Covid-19.

Before Robinsons, there was John Little, Carrefour, Duty Free, Metro, Forever 21 that closed. Did these companies close because of high rentals alone? I don't think it is essentially the government's job to bail out companies like these (but do note that the government did in fact try to help wage supplement with all the packages to hep soften the blow to Singaporeans).

Also, retail malls would have to evolve to stay relevant to changing consumer habits. There are also blogshops like Love Bonito that open brick and motar shop to better reach its consumers. Why isn't the traditional departmental store model working out? Businesses will have to keep evolving to stay relevant. Meanwhile, malls may change to incoporate more eateries (as have been an observed trend over the years)


This won't be the last closure we are seeing anytime soon for sure as the group that owns Robinsons also own other brands like Marks & Spencer, Zara and Mango. 

SReits in spotlight due to Robinson's exposure


I believe that these malls would no doubt recover over time. The question remains only to answer is how long these Covid-19 restrictions and fear would prolong plus how would the market recover as new tenants take over the vacated spaces. This in turn means that if we are to buy in, we would need holding power to stomach further potential losses to reap the potential gain when it recovers.

This means we need to have a high saving % to be able to deploy money we would not need in the immediate future for survival (with emergency fund).

1. CapitaMall Trust (SGX: C38U) has changed name to CapLand IntCom T (SGX: C38U) - largest exposure to the group by store count with 15 outlets. Trading at $1.76 which has dropped off from recent $2.00 levels. Of course the parent CapitaLand (SGX: C31) is also affected. 


2. Frasers Cpt Tr (SGX: J69U) - second largest exposure with 11 outlets.


3. Other counters affected potentially by links to the Al-Futtaim brands:

  • StarhillGbl Reit (SGX: P40U) - Ngee Ann City, Wisma Atria
  • Lendlease Reit(JYEU.SI) - 313@somerset
  • Mapletree Com Tr(N2IU.SI) - VivoCity

Likewise, these counters have seen their stock prices dropped (but these were more on the backdrop of fear of Covid wave 2 on the global scene and US stimulus talks).

Every 危机 (danger) also represents 转机 (opportunity). Wishing all friends and investors good health amidst this global pandemic as it drags on.

K.C.
If you like this post, you might like our facebook page as well. I'm also on Investing Note. I am also partnering with Reit-tirement blog and other bloggers to share ideas at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1397925937071525/


Disclaimer: The views expressed, opinion and information in this article are strictly for informational purposes to encourage educational discussions only. No content on this site constitutes - or should be understood as constituting - a recommendation to enter any securities transactions or to engage in any of the investment strategies presented in our site content. We do not provide personalised recommendations or views as to whether a particular stock or investment approach is suitable to the financial needs of a specific individual. No representation or warranty expressed or implied is made as to, and no reliance shall be placed on, the fairness, accuracy, completeness or correctness of the information or opinions contained on this website. "30 Year Old Investor" shall not be liable whatsoever for loss or damages of any kind arising from the result of any use, reliance or distribution of the articles or its contents from information contained on this website. 

Thursday, 19 March 2020

Covid-19 Crash: Amusing behaviours encountered + updates

  Posted at  March 19, 2020 2 comments
"Your blog is growing grass!" a reader J exclaimed over a Whatsapp chat as we exchanged updates on latest developments on the Covid-19. Sheepishly, I gave a weak excuse and later admitted that I have been lazy.

Indeed, my regular interactions have been reduced to just 2 small chat groups with some of my closest investor friends. Late February, the market caught many off guard as many are not sure what to make of the market tanking in our blank faces. Some bought in thinking it would rise back up as previous times last year.

Of course, this time is different. The crash finally arrived.

The tl;dr 5 min summary:

1. Background: This February-March 2020 market crash is probably the worst we've had in recorded history. It has been waiting to happen for sometime. In the Covid-19 pandemic and Oil price war, we've finally met the triggers that sparked the downward spiral. I do not think that this market crash will let up anytime soon, given that the Covid-19 is just about to reach it's peak in Europe and just starting in the US. There could be more room to fall.

2. KC encountered some amusing investor/ trader behaviours this crash:
- Behaviour 1: A few readers asking KC how to open CDP/brokerage accounts saying "We want to invest because the markets crashed!"

- Behaviour 2: One reader, without any prior investing knowledge or knowing anything plonked all his money into derivatives tanking substantial losses. (good luck) "All IN!" "High risk, High Gain!"

3. Personal Updates and thoughts:
- KC was busy from January to March due to run in of night class modules (3 days night classes per week). Exams plus assignments plus exams plus assignments... it's finally going to be over soon.
- KC is also working hard with new projects, new opportunities and responsibilities given at work.
- KC been saving cash since November 2019.
- Portfolio tanking a -15% loss at the moment.
- Some seasoned investor friends have shared with me that this period is a highly stressful period for them as this is truly an unprecedented black swan event. >30% loss over 2 weeks is quite heavy to stomach.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The backdrop: A Market Wide Crash
Global markets plummeted since late February and have fallen about 30% off from its peak given the backdrop of 2 triggers:

1. Covid-19: An unknown Coronavirus that (probably) originated in China during late November 2019 sparked mass panic in a number of South East Asian countries before causing widespread panic similarly when the pandemic reached Europe eventually and US soil later on. Globally, businesses are suffering with some companies at the forefront of it (such as tourism, hospitality, airline companies). This is mainly due to a huge drop in consumption of goods and services globally out of fear and panic of the risks of contracting the virus.

Dow Jones index dropped about 30% from recent high.
Interestingly, the US market did not respond to monetary policies rolled out by the Trump administration nor the quantitative easing (QE) policies from Fed cuts. This was unlike previous round of QE when it seemingly propped up and supported the market and businesses alike.

2: Russia-Saudi Arabia Oil Price War: As an employee working in the Oil and Gas industry, I could say this has been an "accident" waiting for a long time to happen. We've all probably known for the longest time that Oil prices are artificially controlled with limits placed on production on the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its allies.

By U.S. Energy Information Administration - https://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/archive/00351705.pdf (Monthly Energy Review, May 2017, Figure 11.1a), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3457602
Over the years, technology have improved such that we are now able to produce much more oil and more efficiently. Basic demand and supply dictates that without any intervention, market forces would drive the prices down.

Now, Russia and Saudi Arabia have picked quite an interesting time to have a go at each other with nobody wanting to back out from selling their oil. Both Russia and Saudi seem okay with trying to kill their competition by engaging in a price war. The result is that oil price is also down about 20%.

Is this going to stop soon?
With the market tanking in such a manner, I personally think it is unlikely that this would let up anytime soon. China seems to have walked out of the episode but over in Europe and US, panic is reaching an all time high.

The extent of devastation is evident in the sheer numbers of deaths.

From an economic standpoint of view: even if we manage to eradicate the virus tomorrow, the effects of the Covid-19 are far reaching and will have a lasting impact on the global economy. We have to be prepared to last for the long haul as investors because this looks like a prolonged period of downturn.

If China's spread lasted from late November 2019 to Mid March, the situation in Europe could carry another 2 months plus at least, and 3-4 months in US at the very least. This means we will have to look towards June to know if there is any chance of it turning around.

Amusing behaviours (encountered as an investor/blogger)
With the market tanking 30% over a matter of days in weeks, some readers finally decided to take action to open their investing accounts. While it is good that you finally take what many have been advocating to start investing, I would encourage new investors to remain cautious because we are now into uncharted territory.

"I want to invest because the market crashed!" one friend told me.

Anyway, I pointed them to resources on how to get started. I could sense that feeling of euphoria and enthusiasm that it seemed such a downer to ask my friend to be more cautious and learn the basics first before diving head in into the work of investing/ trading. I remember my own sense of excitement when I decided to start investing as well.

Well, at least even a lay man could tell what this stock market crash means. It is a 10 year one time golden opportunity to accumulate stocks on the "cheap". But, the challenge here is that there is some danger here.

Lack of capital and the trouble of bottom fishing

As new investors, I know too well that one of the main constraints is actually having a discipline towards saving: this is the pre-cursor to having capital to deploy. For budding investors, many of us do not have enough to deploy. This is because investments are ideally suitable only for money that we do not need immediately. (Meaning we are able to take a certain degree of losses on them). This is also known as the ability to hold, or holding power. We will not be forced to liquidate positions due to a lack of cash for our daily use.

This therefore requires some careful planning and objective goal setting. As a new investor I would say that the objectives boil down to these 3 points: (at least personally)

1. Having a discipline to save / finding more income
The crash is going to pass us by if we don't have any capital to deploy when it comes back up eventually. Most friends I know simply don't save enough. We are living it up and spending on items such as gaining travel experiences and entertainment. It's not too late to start planning to save a portion first before spending on what you want.

2. Minimising costs of investing
The most absurd thing I've heard from a financial planner friend is that :"If she can earn 6% for her client, it is only right for her to take 2-3% (as commissions)" As a former planner myself, I can tell you that many people who manage others' money out there are only interested in lining their own pockets. You will do yourself a service to learn how to invest at lower costs. Otherwise, you are just helping others to get rich.

3. Managing the downside risks and making calculated risks for potential gain
The crux message of this point is essentially risk management. You identify the potential hazards ahead of your investing journey and doing your best to mitigate them by evaluating the control measures you are going to take to limit your losses. For example, to invest in stocks, you would do well to educate yourself on how to evaluate stocks. Another way, of course is to jump in and find out later that you are swimming with in the sea with no life jackets.

I think one of my friends did a bad move
Recently out of the blue, one of my friends who asked me about how to start investing told me that he probably made a stupid mistake.

He told me that he started "investing" but is tanking some 30-40% loss when the week before I specifically warned that the market crash was going to get worse.

On further pressing, I discovered that he was "investing" in derivatives but do not understand the nature of derivatives and it being a leveraged tool. He thought that it was the same as stocks. In my opinion, this was probably the worst way one can start investing. Firstly, he did not understand the tool (derivative being used here) and how it works. Secondly, there is no plan, no nothing.

Just simply "High risk high gain, and ALL IN".

I questioned what is the rationale for using this derivative tool. He mentions that investing in traditional stock is far too slow. Using the derivative allows leveraging an "higher potential returns."

"Be greedy when others are fearful, and be fearful when others are greedy". 

At this point, I'm rather stumped for words. I wonder if there were more friends like this one who is plonking all his hard earned money this way. Luck seldom makes one rich, and if we depended on luck its more akin to gambling than anything else.

Please people, exercise caution and restraint. This is not like going to the supermarket and snatching what is available with the panic FOMO buys.

March Personal updates and thoughts
My night classes are finally coming to an end: I have no idea if I made it in the final assessment due to my hectic schedule from February to March. I will find out at the end of the month.

Work wise, I have been given new opportunities to shine at work and I'm devoting a huge time and effort to ensure so (which explains why I'm having less time here). However, due to the Covid-19, a chance to go overseas for a short stint has probably gone up in smoke. Over at my new company, news of retrenchment again is announced. Luckily this time, I am not affected. I checked with a few of my friends in the same sector and it was quite congruent that many are cutting people now given the bleak outlook ahead.

Portfolio wise: 

I've not added any more new positions since late last year and been keeping cash. Current invested amount is around $18,000 and the current value is around $14,000. I'm sitting on $30,000 cash pile but am hesitant to deploy it since it is partially earmarked as wedding planning fund.

Shocked, with trembling fear:
One of my closest investor friend who is arguably my most profitable trading/investing friend saw his profits from a few years earlier wiped out during the circuit-breaker weeks where the markets dropped 7% and were halted. He personally told me that this was an unprecedented move and it is certainly a highly stressful event for him.

If we cannot stomach those losses then we probably shouldn't be investing. It is perfectly fine if one does not invest: as long as you live within means and spend less than what you earn, technically you don't need to.

Stay Safe, Play Safe.

p.s. Special thanks to Pete for proof-reading. But there might still be some grammatical errors. :)

K.C.
If you like this post, you might like our facebook page as well. I'm also on Investing Note.

7. Why I refuse to spend >15-30 minutes budgeting each month

Disclaimer: The views expressed, opinion and information in this article are strictly for informational purposes to encourage educational discussions only. It is important to conduct your own analysis before making any investment decisions based on your own personal circumstances. You should take reasonable measures such as seeking independent financial advice from professionals and/or independently research and verify the information that you find on "30 Year Old Investor" before undertaking any important investment decisions. No content on this site constitutes - or should be understood as constituting - a recommendation to enter any securities transactions or to engage in any of the investment strategies presented in our site content. We do not provide personalised recommendations or views as to whether a particular stock or investment approach is suitable to the financial needs of a specific individual. No representation or warranty expressed or implied is made as to, and no reliance shall be placed on, the fairness, accuracy, completeness or correctness of the information or opinions contained on this website. "30 Year Old Investor" shall not be liable whatsoever for loss or damages of any kind arising from the result of any use, reliance or distribution of the articles or its contents from information contained on this website. 

Tuesday, 7 January 2020

Portfolio/ Work Outlook 2020 & interesting reads (8th Jan)

  Posted at  January 07, 2020 2 comments









Wishing fellow investors, friends and readers a HAPPY NEW YEAR 2020!

A few readers have started to gently remind me that I'm late for my blog post update! 😅 Would firstly like to thank all of you for your continued support and concern since I started investing in February 2018. Time flies, 2 years have passed in a blink of an eye.

tl;dr (Too long, didn't read) Summary:
1. Busy Dec Period: Taking a toll but Fruitful - 
Work, studies and relationship commitments have taken up considerable time.

2. Portfolio update: Outlook for next 2-3 years -
Investment portfolio is likely to take a backseat. Currently, I am gearing up for wedding/HDB. If you have any pro-tips regarding couple finance/ saving for HDB/Wedding, please do leave a comment/drop me an email! 😊

3. Work update: Performance for the year/ Career building - 
Career is at a stage it can go either way. I need to secure a promotion before the current boss moves on to his next post (2 years target, 4 years max). Overall secured a good performance this year and will have chance for further exposure.

4. Interesting reads and thoughts of KC
- Sing vs. Singh
- LV's success and why we should aim to go over to business side on a company as an employee.
- Sugar baby: Would you be one?

1. Busy Dec Period: Taking a toll but Fruitful

Work:
Indeed, December has been a crazy month with my work as I saw a ramp up of work activities due to my department trying to spend the allocated funds for projects.

Gatherings/Paktor (dating):
Christmas and New Year was also a great time to get together with friends whom I have not seen for some time to catch up as well as to spend time with our loved ones. I would like to thank my loved ones for being my pillar of strength and support. You know who you are! ❤️ And so, one colleague and a long time University buddy both invited me to their HDB. Co-incidentally, both are in Sengkang. And so, it kickstarted a HDB conversation between my partner and I. One thing I learnt was that renovations could be cheap(er) and your house turns out more unique/ customised if you do not go to the interior designer.

Night Classes:
My night classes are starting to take its toll on my body with packed classes in the evenings on most Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. I have to somehow last till end of March. Short term pain for Long term gain. Press on!!

2. Portfolio update: Outlook for next 2-3 years

My Priorities have changed: for the next 2-3 years, from being a single person to starting preparations for marriage. As a result, my portfolio savings goals is likely to take a hit. Something has got to give way so I will have to be more prudent in my daily spending to maximise my savings over this period.

This also means that I will have minimal capital to deploy and will have to be more prudent in screening my counters. First and foremost, the bottleneck would be savings and the main constraint is the limited amount of salary I have. It is either I spend less, save more or I increase my salary somehow.

I am also on the lookout for BTO but I am quite inexperienced in this aspect: if you have any opinion and good advice regarding HDB/BTO, feel free to drop a comment below or drop me an email. I would really appreciate it!

On my portfolio side, there is some speculation that AIMS Apac Reit would be in for a M&A: https://www.investingnote.com/posts/1778469. Meanwhile I would keep calm and collect my dividends.

Portfolio as of Jan 2020
Stock nameCodeEntry priceSharesPrice% AllocationType
1FCOTND8U1.467410001467.373.61Base
2FLTBUOU1.071225002677.886.60Base
3SingtelZ743.318210003318.168.17Base
4APTTS7OU0.1631100001631.44.02Base
5VicomV016.03405003016.997.43Base
6SSBJust for reference1.0000200020024.93Base
7
8AimsO5RU1.380030004152.4810.23Base
9Cash$22,333.06*55.01Cash
Total Amount$40,599.34100.00

- Portfolio value is $42,318.06 at end of 2019.
- *$20,000 earmarked for wedding/housing fund. (expect my portfolio to take a hit)

Short Term Goal 2-3 years
Wedding/Housing Fund Target: (approx. $800 per month min.)

YearYear Start ValueTarget ValueActual Value
2020$20,000$29,600
2021$29,600$39,200
2022$39,200$48,800

Projections (since inception):
Road to Financial Independence
PROJECTIONACTUAL FIGURES
YearAgePortfolio
Projected 2%/yr
Current capital
injection Rate/yr
Estimated
Dividend 3%
Actual Portfolio
at end of yr
Actual Capital
Injection/yr
Actual
Dividends
201831$12,000.00$12,000.00$360.00$15,941.59$16,928.40513.25
201932$24,600.00$12,000.00$738.00$42,318.06$23,670.94$890.54
202033$37,830.00$12,000.00$1,134.90$22,318.06
(Till Date)


(-$20,000 for Wedding/HDB fund)
-
(Till Date)

(Till Date)

Long term portfolio goals would stay as per the table under the Portfolio Update page. It remains to be seen how much I would be affected with the goals shift. 

3. Work update: Performance for the year/ Career building

My job transition has stabilised and it is time to think about improving my current skillset so that I can hopefully move up to the next level in my career.

I have been incredibly lucky to secure a pay raise and severance (previously retrenched) as well as a chance to travel abroad for business for exposure in my new employment.

Added responsibilities beyond current job scope (can be a double-edged sword):
The positive here is that my current boss thinks that I am performing well and turning out good results as compared to a few colleagues who are in a similar level to my role despite only being in my role for half a year. Consequently, I will have a chance to prove myself as I take on added work (tasks for the next level job) outside of the core responsibilities of my current role as well as more opportunities to gain exposure and experience.

The drawback is that I will definitely have less time for monitoring that market (which is probably fine since I will have less capital to deploy). And also, past experience at my old company where I was retrenched has taught me that things can change very fast, especially if my boss were to be changed by the management or re-located to elsewhere in the company.

I might lose favour and get stuck so I am under some pressure to push and secure for the promotion fast within 2 years. If I do not manage to secure this by end of 4 years, it would mean that I have got stuck because by then my current boss is likely to move on to his next post.

--------------------------------------------------

4. Interesting reads and thoughts of KC (8/1/2020)

#1: Sing vs. Singh: Singaporeans vs. PRs?



Read More: https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/chan-chun-sing-and-pritam-singh-spar-parliament-over-data-distribution-new-jobs-among

Read More: https://www.todayonline.com/commentary/singapores-economic-growth-and-job-creation-have-benefited-citizens-more-foreigners

*Disclaimer: This is just my opinion and based on anecdotal experiences. I am not siding any political party, but more concerned about Singaporean's future and my own future as a Singaporean.

One of the major talking points that have caught my attention was this Sing vs. Singh showdown in parliament where our opposition is questioning and pressing our ruling party to inform us of the exact breakdown of Singaporeans and PRs in what is defined as "local PMETs"

This is a tough and a cold hard truth Singaporeans may have to face: Are Singaporeans these days so strawberry that we have to rely on policies to guarantee we get ahead in this supposedly meritocratic system?

But, if we go down such a path, it is dangerous because in the private sector, work quality counts. And in some cases, the work quality I have seen from some of my Singaporean colleagues really make it hard to justify putting them ahead of FTs in my various stints at a few MNCs. Many of the FTs I have worked with in MNCs have good exposure, turn out better work quality, better work attitude and are far more humble and open to learn than Singaporean colleagues.

I really feel that the government should release the statistics and let us draw our own conclusions. If we are failing, we need to know and we need a knock on our heads, fast.

#2: The Story behind Louis Vuitton

  

In my previous blog post, I shared this video (a documentary on LV's success I watched on my flight back):

Firstly, I gained a good understanding of branding and business models of a successful business that I find is commonly found in other businesses as well. Successful businesses often are able to charge premium for their products, create a good and loyal customer experience and while earning a high margin. From an investing point of view, a 40% margin would mean a highly profitable business.



A breakdown of LV's cost in a bag is as the picture above.

The people who actually make the bag only earn the pie from 10% of the price of the bag. The sales person earns from the 50% pie, while the company takes in 40% profit. I find this a sobering thought now that I am in a business related function, having come from a technical background within my industry. Folks in the business side have far more chances for advancements while the manufacturing folks are often kept there (don't fix what isn't spoilt) as production managers in the manufacturing departments often try to keep things status quo.

I used to envision a career in Technical, but in most companies, Sales teams often have a louder voice and are the decision makers in the company. This is true for my current and previous company. Even if you make the world's best bag, it would be nothing if nobody knew about it and none of it gets sold.

Where would we want to be in a company? Think again.

I could be misguided by my own experiences but I would definitely want to leverage on my technical experience to try to gravitate towards sales/marketing functions and customer facing roles as I can already feel a considerable difference being employed on the business side.

#3: Sugar baby: Would you be one?



At this point... just want to put out the supposed "benefits" of sugar dating the lady got:

- HP laptop
- Pandora custom made necklace
- Hotel stays and private yacht trips
- Iphone
- ~ $3,000 SGD allowance
- Support daily expenses, pay for student loans

I'm rather speechless with this one. But I do think she is rather brave to be truthful about this. I think she has a day job that earns around $3,000 as well so I guess this gives her the ability to sustain the kind of lifestyle or dating she wants. I just can't help but wonder if this is an exploitation disguised as 'dating'.

Read More: https://www.businessinsider.sg/sugar-baby-relationship-sugar-daddy-what-its-like-2019-8/?r=US&IR=T

What do you think?

K.C.
If you like this post, you might like our facebook page as well. I'm also on Investing Note.

7. Why I refuse to spend >15-30 minutes budgeting each month

Disclaimer: The views expressed, opinion and information in this article are strictly for informational purposes to encourage educational discussions only. It is important to conduct your own analysis before making any investment decisions based on your own personal circumstances. You should take reasonable measures such as seeking independent financial advice from professionals and/or independently research and verify the information that you find on "30 Year Old Investor" before undertaking any important investment decisions. No content on this site constitutes - or should be understood as constituting - a recommendation to enter any securities transactions or to engage in any of the investment strategies presented in our site content. We do not provide personalised recommendations or views as to whether a particular stock or investment approach is suitable to the financial needs of a specific individual. No representation or warranty expressed or implied is made as to, and no reliance shall be placed on, the fairness, accuracy, completeness or correctness of the information or opinions contained on this website. "30 Year Old Investor" shall not be liable whatsoever for loss or damages of any kind arising from the result of any use, reliance or distribution of the articles or its contents from information contained on this website. 
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30 Year Old Investor
Sow today, Reap Tomorrow

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About

You don't need to pay anyone/company to have a plan of your own and work towards achieving Financial Independence. Only we alone have no conflict of interest with our own money. "30 Year Old Investor" is a personal blog about a Singaporean's savings and investing journey.


Being the average Singaporean, K.C. is also interested in good food, a little bit of politics and a good slice of humour.

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Disclaimer

Disclaimer: The views expressed, opinion and information in this article are strictly for informational purposes to encourage educational discussions only.

No content on this site constitutes - or should be understood as constituting - a recommendation to enter any securities transactions or to engage in any of the investment strategies presented in our site content. We do not provide personalised recommendations or views as to whether a particular stock or investment approach is suitable to the financial needs of a specific individual. No representation or warranty expressed or implied is made as to, and no reliance shall be placed on, the fairness, accuracy, completeness or correctness of the information or opinions contained on this website.

"30 Year Old Investor" shall not be liable whatsoever for loss or damages of any kind arising from the result of any use, reliance or distribution of the articles or its contents from information contained on this website.

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